Modest fashion shows have been a thing. The U.S. is hosting its first this fall

Modest fashion shows representing women of different cultural and religious backgrounds have been rising in popularity all over the world and are now making their way to the U.S. The country’s first-ever modest fashion week is currently in the making and is set to be held in Miami between Nov. 30 and Dec. 2.

With that, the city follows in the footsteps of Milan, Istanbul, Dubai, and London, all of which have previously hosted similar events.

Titled the Miami Modest Fashion Week, the event will bring together fashion houses, influencers, brands, designers, and models from all around the globe. According to its organizers, the aim behind the fashion week is “to unite the industry’s best talents in the most dynamic strategy which will translate into stronger shows for designers, buyers and brands in the modest fashion industry for future generations.”

Speaking to Grazia ME, the founder of the three-day event, Malaysian-born Norsham Mohamad-Garcia, explained the reason behind it.

“I am very proud of this project. We believe in education, creativity, diversity and authenticity, the future. In America, there are a lot of mass markets, behind which identity is lost. Modest designers are very creative and create unique clothes. Americans are very fond of original clothes, the thirst for exclusivity is a big plus for modest designers,” she said.

“I believe that Modest-style Fashion Week will cause a wow effect and will resonate with many,” she added.

Modest fashion weeks are becoming more popular

Modest fashion has been highlighted in major international events, including New York Fashion Week, but events focused solely on modesty in fashion only recently became a thing.

In 2017, the UK held its first-ever event of the kind. At the time, the London Modest Fashion Week (LMFW) brought together more than 40 designers from countries including the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Turkey, and ­Malaysia. The show was not exclusive to Muslims or hijabis, but rather targeted women of all faiths and cultures who like a little bit more coverage.

Similar events are rising in popularity and highlight the fact that veiled women and those who opt for modest attire are part and parcel of the fashion industry.

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